The Pyramid in Practice: Hidden Mickeys

As I explain in The Imagineering Pyramid, the interesting thing about Hidden Mickeys to me is that once you find one, you never see it the same way again. They are a fun and captivating way in which the Imagineers engage their audience.

During our recent trip to Walt Disney World, we found a handful of Hidden Mickeys, some of which we’d seen before, some of which were new to us. We don’t go out of our way to look for them, but if / when any of us spot one we make sure to share what we found.

So, which Hidden Mickeys did we see?

At Magic Kingdom we caught the plates on the banquet table in the ballroom scene in the Haunted Mansion.

At Animal Kingdom, I didn’t get a chance to see my all-time favorite Hidden Mickey in the Expedition Everest standby queue (we used a Fast Pass and single rider), but we found this one in the Kali River Rapids queue:

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At Epcot, we saw Hidden Mickeys on a handful of of attractions, including:

  • On Living with the Land, we spotted the shrimp tube and the garden hose (among others),
  • On Soarin’ Around the World, we spotted the hot air balloons,
  • At The Seas with Nemo and Friends we found the aquarium rocks. 
  • In Spaceship Earth we saw another one of my favorites, the paint circles.
  • In the Frozen Ever After standby queue, we spotted this one:

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What are some of your favorite Hidden Mickeys? Let me know in the comments!

[Links courtesy of Steven M. Barrett’s HiddenMickeyGuy.com website.]

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The Pyramid in Practice: Theming and Resorts

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In the Theming chapter of The Imagineering Pyramid, I wrote about the use of theming at the resorts at Walt Disney World, specifically the use of a filmstrip motif at Disney’s All Star Movies Resort.

I think the use of this filmstrip motif is a great example of theming at work outside of the theme parks. When the book was published I wasn’t able to include pictures of the ways in which the filmstrip motif is used at the resort. Fortunately, my family and I stayed at this resort during our recent trip to Walt Disney World, and I was able to get a couple of pictures to show how the Imagineers used this motif in the design of the resort. Let’s take a look.

First, the filmstrip can be seen on the backs of the chairs in the food court:

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Chairs at the food court at Disney’s All-Star Movie Resort.

The filmstrip motif is also used on the hand railings on the upper floors of the resort buildings. These are further themed with items appropriate to the specific buildings (Fantasia, Toy Story, Herbie the Love Bug, etc. We were staying on one of the Love Bug buildings.).

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Our “Love Bug” building  at the resort.

One other use of this motif is in the design of tiles in the bathroom showers. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to get a good picture of those during our visit.

As I wrote in The Imagineering Pyramid,

“The filmstrip motif serves as a constant and subtle means of reinforcing the movie theme around which the resort is built.”

 

Thoughts? Let me know what you think in the comments!

The Most Magical Place on Earth!

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I’m heading to Walt Disney World today for a family vacation. The plan is to try to take our time and have a (somewhat) relaxing visit.  Either way, I know we’ll have a great time!

Among some planned highlights, we’re going to check out Flight of Passage and Pandora, Frozen Ever After (haven’t had a chance to experience that yet) as well as the recently updated Pirates of the Caribbean, featuring the new auction scene.

I’m also hoping we can luck into a soft opening of Toy Story Land (or at least Slinky Dog Dash).

See you real soon!

Another Imagineering Process Update

Here’s another brief update on the status of The Imagineering Process.

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I recently was in touch with my publisher, Theme Park Press and it looks like the release will most likely push out into early May. Again, as we get closer I’ll have a better estimate.

I’ve also received a few more testimonial “blurbs” (or jacket quotes) including blurbs from:

As I noted before, as we get closer to the release I’ll share the testimonials here (as well as on Facebook and Twitter), and I’ll also be posting some snippets from the book that provide a high-level look at the seven stages that comprise the Imagineering Process.

 

Thanks!

Imagineering Process Update

I know it’s been a long time since my last post. My apologies.

I wanted to post a brief update on the status of The Imagineering Process.

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I submitted the final draft to my publisher, Theme Park Press. Right now we’re looking at a release in late March to mid-April. As we get closer I’ll have a better estimate.

I’ve also sent the final manuscript to some friends, colleagues, and nice folks who have agreed to write testimonial “blurbs” (or jacket quotes) for the book. So far I’ve received testimonials from:

  • Lee Cockerell, Former Executive Vice President, Walt Disney World® Resort and Best Selling author of Creating Magic…10 Common Sense Leadership Strategies from a Life at Disney, The Customer Rules, Time Management Magic, and Career Magic.
  • David Burkus, author of Friend of a Friend, Under New Management, and The Myths of Creativity
  • Sam Gennawey, author of Walt Disney and the Promise of Progress City, The Disneyland Story: The Unofficial Guide to the Evolution of Walt Disney’s Dream, and Universal versus Disney: The Unofficial Guide to American Theme Parks’ Greatest Rivalry
  • Brian Collins, Former Imagineer & WDI Show Writer
  • Jeffrey A. Barnes, Dean of Student Success at California Baptist University and best-selling author of The Wisdom of Walt series
  • Louis L. Lemoine, Retired Walt Disney Imagineer and Disney Legacy Award recipient

I’m expecting blurbs from a few other folks as well, and will post an update when I have more to share.

So far the response to the book has been better than I could have hoped for.

As we get closer to the release I’ll share the testimonials here (as well as on Facebook and Twitter), and I’ll also be posting some snippets from the book that provide a high-level look at the seven stages that comprise the Imagineering Process.

 

More soon.

Thanks!